Friday, April 06, 2007

He's Actually Closer to 67 Now...

But back in 1990, there was a big celebration for Bugs Bunny's 50th Birthday!
I recently found a copy of the Bugs Bunny magazine published by Time Inc. in celebration of Warner Bros' top rabbit! This magazine is chock full of tasty animation related articles and pics for classic animation entusiasts.
There is "current" news about Warner Bros animation. A collector mock-up of an animation cel featured in "Box Office Bunny", the animated short directed by Darrell Van Citters. A Bugs history by Leonard Maltin. A making-of article for Box Office Bunny. An article about Jeff Bergman, Bugs' "new" voiceman. A collection of various comic strips celebrating 50 years of Bugs.
An interview with Chuck Jones & Friz Freleng. An article with Dan Romanelli, Bugs' agent. An introduction to Warner Bros Television Animation's "Tiny Toons".
If you can find a copy, pick it up! It's a great find. I'm sure all of you that still have a copy would say the same...

4 comments:

David Germain said...

I bought that magazine way back in the day. I'm sure it's still in a box somewhere.

J.E.Daniels said...

Did you happen to notice who was writing the Pogo strip?

David Germain said...

Larry Doyle. Not surprised. I read somewhere that he was one of the writers responsible for the versions of Pogo that caused a severe backlash from its fans. It's one of the prime examples people use to support the position of "nobody should continue a comic strip after the original artist has passed".

The only franchise inwhich he didn't give a black-eye to is The Simpsons.

Anonymous said...

To be frank, Doyle-written Pogo was in fact excellent. But Doyle got tired of writing and left voluntarily. After that, artist Neal Sternecky continued as writer with results just about as good.
The problems came when several Kelly family members expressed an interest in writing and drawing the strip. In what can only be called a serious case of nepotism, Sternecky was thrown off and the strip's worst period began. Peter and Carolyn Kelly clearly liked the characters, but couldn't draw them nearly as well as Sternecky -- and the writing was even worse. If you can imagine Pogo strips without punch lines, that's what we got. This is when my college paper dropped the strip; when I moved to other papers in search of it, they began to drop it, too.