Thursday, January 08, 2009

Translated Tom & Jerry Strips

Cartoonist Oscar Martin received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Warner Bros in 2002 for his career as scriptwriter and cartoonist of the Tom & Jerry comics.
His work has been published in numerous countries in various languages. Martin's art and stories were available in North America for a brief time when Harvey Comics was publishing a T&J title in the early '90s.
Earlier posts of Oscar Martin's T&J work can be seen here and here.
Thanks to my online friend Christopher Signore who owns some French issues of Martin's Tom & Jerry comics, Chris took the time to translate and scan some strips for our reading pleasure. Be sure to check out Chris' artwork on his personal website!

2 comments:

Christopher said...

I'm pleased to see these finally online but kinda upset that no one else has said a word about them, story or art wise. :/

Ah well, thanks again for the keen nod towards me, J.E 8-)

ramapith said...

Oscar Martin's Tom and Jerry are superbly drawn, and I've seen some great stories from him, too...
I don't mean to rain on your parade, though, but these one-pagers aren't his best work. Many of them are really just variations on the same gag, not a very original or character-specific one: "Some everyday item of Tom's provides an unexpected convenience for the smaller Jerry."
Sadly, there's never been a very good edition of Martin's stuff Stateside. Harvey exercised an option to use English translations prepared by a Swedish publisher, resulting in virtually humorless dialogue and astoundingly unprofessional examples of "Engrish". More recently, I've seen a short T&J giveaway from DC promoting the "War of the Whiskers" video game; this too featured Martin's work, translated a little better this time, but the translator clearly didn't know Tom and Jerry had ever spoken in English language comics before, so they wound up speaking banal, vaguely teen lingo.
I'd so love to see Martin's T&J translated the right way... with a saucy/smug tone modeled on Harvey Eisenberg's classics.